From the Ashes

From the Ashes

My Story of Being Métis, Homeless, and Finding My Way

eBook - 2019
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In this extraordinary and inspiring debut memoir, Jesse Thistle, once a high school dropout and now a rising Indigenous scholar, chronicles his life on the streets and how he overcame trauma and addiction to discover the truth about who he is. If I can just make it to the next minute...then I might have a chance to live; I might have a chance to be something more than just a struggling crackhead. From the Ashes is a remarkable memoir about hope and resilience, and a revelatory look into the life of a Métis-Cree man who refused to give up. Abandoned by his parents as a toddler, Jesse Thistle briefly found himself in the foster-care system with his two brothers, cut off from all they had known. Eventually the children landed in the home of their paternal grandparents, whose tough-love attitudes quickly resulted in conflicts. Throughout it all, the ghost of Jesse’s drug-addicted father haunted the halls of the house and the memories of every family member. Struggling with all that had happened, Jesse succumbed to a self-destructive cycle of drug and alcohol addiction and petty crime, spending more than a decade on and off the streets, often homeless. Finally, he realized he would die unless he turned his life around. In this heart-warming and heart-wrenching memoir, Jesse Thistle writes honestly and fearlessly about his painful past, the abuse he endured, and how he uncovered the truth about his parents. Through sheer perseverance and education—and newfound love—he found his way back into the circle of his Indigenous culture and family. An eloquent exploration of the impact of prejudice and racism, From the Ashes is, in the end, about how love and support can help us find happiness despite the odds.
Publisher: [S.l.]: Simon & Schuster, 2019.
ISBN: 9781982101237
Characteristics: 368 p.
Additional Contributors: cloudLibrary

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m
mclarjh
Oct 15, 2020

Ordinary writing, present tense makes for juvenile tone, short chapters easy to read, but too lengthy overall.

d
dirtbag
Aug 14, 2020

I wish it had won Canada Reads 2020.

l
lyndasclater
Aug 13, 2020

Book club July 2020

t
Tammy_H
Jul 11, 2020

This book is an amazingly raw and honest depiction of the authors life and struggles. I believe his story deeply resingnates and represents the struggles that happens in the indigenous culture. Hopefully the readers come to this book with an openness to really hear and see how society has impacted the indigenous community. Also how addiction can cause so much damage for generations.

r
RueK
Jul 10, 2020

Incredible memoir of an individual's account on his journey through addiction and homelessness and struggles with family. I discovered it's a great companion read to Gabor Mate's book on addiction which I happened to read prior. If you want to understand people with addictions more, or have someone close struggling with addiction, this is a must read. If you want to learn more about marginalized people, this is a must read. Overall, a must read.

n
Nettie1963
Jun 08, 2020

A well written and brutally honest memoir.

s
soltinepp
May 18, 2020

Fantastic and inspiring true story!

d
DonHow
Apr 22, 2020

This moving memoir is written in a matter-of-fact, honest and conversational style where Jesse tells his story taking responsibility for the situation, he ended up in. The storytelling in this book brought me to places in Toronto, Vancouver and Ottawa where I have never gone, only heard about. As the book progressed, I tried to read this memoir without judging Jesse because of the early trauma, prejudice and racism he had endured. Jesse does not write himself as a hero but as a man with hope as he battles back to his indigenous culture, family and humanity.

IndyPL_MagalyC Apr 22, 2020

This memoir had me at the edge of my seat to find out how Thistle overcomes his drug and alcohol addiction. Thistle is candid in his experiences and I found myself holding my breath in anticipation (and anxiety) when following his downward spiral and struggle for survival. Despite many of the gut-wrenching descriptions and heartbreaking circumstances, this book was impossible to put down. It is a must-read for gaining insight on a unique perspective on Metis-Cree peoples, racism, drug addiction, and homelessness.

p
pohpoh
Feb 22, 2020

A must read! I just couldn't put the book down until I finished it. Bravo to the author for able to turn his life around under all odds and wrote such a masterpiece. It's time more should be done to improve the lives of our Indigenous people and provide better support to indigenous youths.

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