The Lost History of Stars

The Lost History of Stars

A Novel

Book - 2017
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"Fourteen-year-old Lettie and her family are Afrikaners, Dutch settlers in turn-of-the-century southern Africa. When the British Empire wages a brief but brutal two-year war against them, Afrikaner forces will lose thirty-five hundred soldiers, but the toll on Dutch women and children will be eight times greater. Now a footnote, this period in history bears one particularly abhorrent distinction: the use of concentration camps three decades before Hitler. More than twenty-six thousand Dutch women and children will have died of disease and starvation in British concentration camps by the war's end. Taken from their farm and forced into one such camp, Lettie and her family fight to survive in the face of unimaginable conditions. Brave, defiant Lettie longs to be a writer. Enriched by fond memories of stargazing with her grandfather before the war and emboldened by her mother's strength in the face of so much hardship, Lettie is a courageous heroine who refuses to be bowed by adversity. Inspired by Dave Boling's grandfather's own experience as a soldier during the Boer War, The Lost History of Stars is carefully researched, richly drawn, and unforgettable"--Provided by publisher.
Publisher: Chapel Hill, North Carolina : Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill, 2017.
Edition: First edition.
ISBN: 9781616204174
1616204176
Branch Call Number: FIC BOLIN
Characteristics: 340 pages ; 24 cm

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reader1499
Jul 08, 2017

Interesting plot but very poor in the execution. A middle-aged male American writer, the author fails to get into the head of a young Afrikaans girl. Talk about cultural appropriation! Plus Afrikaners did not call a British solder a Tommy. They were more likely to call him a khaki. This glaring error was enough to jerk me out of the world he was trying to portray. And it didn't help that his writing is very uneven. Yes, I did try to read further but when he writes that after the family is put into the concentration camp, Lettie tells herself that she has "no choice but to adapt and to do so in a manner befitting the mature, thirteen-year-old adult" she'd become, I couldn't force myself to read anymore.

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